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#3841: 'SE BON KI RA' : Lamour comments




From:YLamour@aol.com

i would like to share with my fellow corbetteers how i arrived at
an explanation and understanding of the syntaxe 
and perhaps the origins of 'se bon ki ra'...

let's take a close look at the following utterances:

1. se okap ki pwp...  
2. se bondye ki gran...
3. se satan ki mechan...
4. se ogoun ki puisan... 
5. se madanm li ki bl...
6. se resin ki te chanpyon...
7. se ayisyen ki frekan...
8. se fanm k'ap mennen...
9. se mango okap ki dous...
10. se datignav ki fanbre...
 
a comparaison and contrast exercise
will first reveal that all 10 utterances partake of
a number of common features such as:
-the presence of the paired construction 'se... ki'...
-a noun interposing 'se' and 'ki'...
-an attribute or a verb follows 'ki'...

the paired construction 'se... ki' denotes emphasis...
(contextually, it is reminiscent of the pair 'se... ye'...
mwen se malere  =  se malere mwen ye...
jan se granng  =  se granng jan ye...
jn se granfanm  =  se granfanm jn ye...)

therefore, 'se bon ki ra' seems to be the emphatic expression of
'bon ra'... haitian creole tends to use emphasis through a linguistic
event called topicalization  a fixed construction allowing the speaker 
to highlight or bring out his ideas...  

now let's analyze 
our 10 utterances in the context of topicalization....

1. okap pwp...  =  se okap ki pwp...
2. bondye gran...  =  se bondye ki gran...
3. satan mechan...  =  se satan ki mechan...
4. ogoun puisan...  =  se ogoun ki puisan...
5. madanm li bl...  =  se madanm li ki bl...
6. resin te chanpyon...  =  se resin ki te chanpyon...
7. ayisyen frekan...  =  se ayisyen ki frekan...
8. fanm ap mennen...  =  se fanm k'ap mennen...
9. mango okap dous...  =  se mango okap ki dous...
10. datignav fanbre...  =  se datignav ki fanbre...

while the proverb 'se bon ki ra' may have come from 
the french language, the contruction 'se... ki' appears to
be as haitian creole as the aforementioned 'se... ye'...  moreover,
the 10 examples in this text can attest to this observation... in fact, i am 
not
quite convinced that it originated from french... if it did, it must
have been naturalized very long ago... for we can multiply other instances
where 'se... ki' is used consistenly....

se dmi ki nan je mwen...
se visye ki nan k yo...
se grangou ki nan wl yo...

please share your own question, clarifications, comments, and suggestions...

warmest cheers,
yvon